Gavin

My space: Gavin Turk

I like to hide away in my store cupboard in Hackney Wick, east London. It’s a tiny little office which is full of bits and pieces. I have a team of people to help me, so they make things in the adjoining studio during the week. That’s much more minimalist.

I cycle here from my home in Hackney at the other side of Victoria Park at about half past nine and spend the first part of the day reading emails before I get going. We tend to have electronic music on in the studio, but it will depend on my mood.

I’ve been here for 12 years. When I moved in, the area was derelict. There are quite a lot of artists around now, but I’m worried they will be priced out.

I must clear these shelves out. But I’m not very good at throwing things away – I don’t like waste. The trouble is, when I have space, I fill it. I might have to start doing car boot fairs.

I bought this at a market because it reminded me of Duchamp’s Fountain. Boot fairs sell all kinds of things. I’m quite nervous about production: things should get used rather than thrown away

Blue Door

I am selling this work in the auction for Macmillan as I lost my dad to cancer a couple of years ago. This image is a photograph from a neon sculpture I made. Neon means doorways to me as it’s often used for signs inviting you in. The door is going to the future, the unknown, the other side. The image suggests the way from life to death

Shoe anvil

I inherited this steel shoe anvil from my father, who was a jeweller. He would use it to fix things around the house. It is about 250 years old and was given to him by his grandfather, an engineer. It’s inspiring to look at – and still useful

Moog theremin

I bought this on the internet six years ago. It came in parts and I had to solder it together. I take it out for gigs, but the instrument often doesn’t survive the journey and I have to fix it at the venue. It works on energy and is temperamental. It makes a crying sound like a violin

Gavin Turk is donating an artwork to the Macmillan De’Longhi Arts Programme, an exhibition and auction at the Darren Baker Gallery in London (Oct 21-27)

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